158 Troop Chronicles – Week 15

158 Troop Chronicles – Week 15

 

Week 15 was in all fairness one of the hardest weeks so far for the men of 158 Troop.  After two weeks off everyone was very well rested and had plenty of stories to tell and thankfully everyone returned in good health – except the few men struggling with hangovers!  It was also great to see our new family once again though just about every man was struggling with a serious case of the Lympstone blues; you must have heard the phrase “I do not want to be here!” about 50 times!  On return we had a room change, one of 158s favourite past times, then tried to get a bit of rest for the week that lay ahead.

 

Monday was a fairly uneventful day, consisting of some lectures, phys, map reading and dealing with general admin after the leave period.  Tuesday was where it all went downhill for 158.  We began the day with a 4 mile speed march which was no real problem for the Troop, this was swiftly followed by some extra phys on the top field to show that we are still able to fight and perform when tired and fatigued, a very important trait for a Royal Marine.  After lunch we were told to bring our fully packed Bergen and webbing (this is a lot of kit) and form up outside.  We knew before leave that we owed for our previous mistakes, though no one could have quite prepared for what was ahead.  We were marched down to the bottom field where we could see that the gates to the estuary were open which only meant one thing.  Mud run…

 

By the end every man was completely unrecognisable, head to toe in thick mud from the estuary.  On completion of this we were hosed down (slightly) and sent back to our grot.  Even though we were tired and knew the amount of cleaning that lay ahead, we laughed all the way back to the grots.  You could never quite describe the amount of cleaning we had to do that night/morning and how much mud we brought back with us, but it is fair to say the vast majority of us had less than an hours sleep, some did not sleep at all – needless to say no-one EVER wanted to go back into the mud!

 

Wednesday was a bit of a blur for most of the Troop as the day was spent in lectures, where we get the nickname ‘nods’; the entire morning was a constant battle to keep our eyes open.  That was up until the afternoon where we were battling to keep our eyes closed through fear of getting CS gas in them while practicing our CBRN drills.  Unfortunately some of the Recruits managed to inhale some gas, which, let me tell you is not a nice experience in the slightest, though quite amusing to see if its not you.

 

Thursday started with our first drill inspection which meant we spent most of Wednesday night making sure our entire rig was impeccable, from our brasses to the finest creases in our shits.  The inspection from the Warrant Officer took around an hour-and-a-half, which is a very long time to spend perfectly still holding a rifle that feels like it is made out of lead.  The inspection went remarkably well, the Warrant Officer felt as though we were turned out to a very good standard and was very impressed with our Corps history.  A special mention must go to our Troop historian Rct Fisher.  The afternoon was spent taking a key skills exam for the majority of the Recruits which we are usually more than happy to do as it gives us a break from proper training.  This was until we found out that the men who were not attending the exam were being given a short introduction to shot guns, pistols, ASMs and the Sharpshooter!

 

Friday morning was another morning of drill.  On returning from drill we were told we had messed up once again, so we were told to get our fully packed Bergen and webbing once again and wait outside.  Oh God, not another mud run?!  We were marched down to the gates where 8 men’s names were called out as runners; they returned a few minutes later covered in mud, it was happening… again.  In our Sections we ran down to estuary  where to our surprise the Company Commander, Troop Commander, Troop Sergeant, PTI and the whole of the Training Team were waiting.  The OC informed us that this was not a mud run but our Phase 1 Pass Out, pheeeeeeewwwwwwwww!  We were given a congratulatory speech; awards and Section Tapes were handed out to the very deserving men.  We finished the day with a bottom field session and a run around the assault course, followed by one of the most intense Close Quarter Combat Sessions we have ever done on the Saturday morning.  So much for a weekend, but at least we get one day off… which we spent buying things and preparing for our next exercise.

 Week 15 was in all fairness one of the hardest weeks so far for the men of 158 Troop.  After two weeks off everyone was very well rested and had plenty of stories to tell and thankfully everyone returned in good health – except the few men struggling with hangovers!  It was also great to see our new family once again though just about every man was struggling with a serious case of the Lympstone blues; you must have heard the phrase “I do not want to be here!” about 50 times!  On return we had a room change, one of 158s favourite past times, then tried to get a bit of rest for the week that lay ahead.

Monday was a fairly uneventful day, consisting of some lectures, phys, map reading and dealing with general admin after the leave period.  Tuesday was where it all went downhill for 158.  We began the day with a 4 mile speed march which was no real problem for the Troop, this was swiftly followed by some extra phys on the top field to show that we are still able to fight and perform when tired and fatigued, a very important trait for a Royal Marine.  After lunch we were told to bring our fully packed Bergen and webbing (this is a lot of kit) and form up outside.  We knew before leave that we owed for our previous mistakes, though no one could have quite prepared for what was ahead.  We were marched down to the bottom field where we could see that the gates to the estuary were open which only meant one thing.  Mud run…

By the end every man was completely unrecognisable, head to toe in thick mud from the estuary.  On completion of this we were hosed down (slightly) and sent back to our grot.  Even though we were tired and knew the amount of cleaning that lay ahead, we laughed all the way back to the grots.  You could never quite describe the amount of cleaning we had to do that night/morning and how much mud we brought back with us, but it is fair to say the vast majority of us had less than an hours sleep, some did not sleep at all – needless to say no-one EVER wanted to go back into the mud!

Wednesday was a bit of a blur for most of the Troop as the day was spent in lectures, where we get the nickname ‘nods’; the entire morning was a constant battle to keep our eyes open.  That was up until the afternoon where we were battling to keep our eyes closed through fear of getting CS gas in them while practicing our CBRN drills.  Unfortunately some of the Recruits managed to inhale some gas, which, let me tell you is not a nice experience in the slightest, though quite amusing to see if its not you.

Thursday started with our first drill inspection which meant we spent most of Wednesday night making sure our entire rig was impeccable, from our brasses to the finest creases in our shits.  The inspection from the Warrant Officer took around an hour-and-a-half, which is a very long time to spend perfectly still holding a rifle that feels like it is made out of lead.  The inspection went remarkably well, the Warrant Officer felt as though we were turned out to a very good standard and was very impressed with our Corps history.  A special mention must go to our Troop historian Rct Fisher.  The afternoon was spent taking a key skills exam for the majority of the Recruits which we are usually more than happy to do as it gives us a break from proper training.  This was until we found out that the men who were not attending the exam were being given a short introduction to shot guns, pistols, ASMs and the Sharpshooter!

Friday morning was another morning of drill.  On returning from drill we were told we had messed up once again, so we were told to get our fully packed Bergen and webbing once again and wait outside.  Oh God, not another mud run?!  We were marched down to the gates where 8 men’s names were called out as runners; they returned a few minutes later covered in mud, it was happening… again.  In our Sections we ran down to estuary  where to our surprise the Company Commander, Troop Commander, Troop Sergeant, PTI and the whole of the Training Team were waiting.  The OC informed us that this was not a mud run but our Phase 1 Pass Out, pheeeeeeewwwwwwwww!  We were given a congratulatory speech; awards and Section Tapes were handed out to the very deserving men.  We finished the day with a bottom field session and a run around the assault course, followed by one of the most intense Close Quarter Combat Sessions we have ever done on the Saturday morning.  So much for a weekend, but at least we get one day off… which we spent buying things and preparing for our next exercise.

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